ITAR Part 124

The Department of State manages the International Traffic in Arms Regulations ITAR Part 124 is AGREEMENTS, OFF-SHORE PROCUREMENT, AND OTHER DEFENSE SERVICES.

The International Traffic in Arms Regulations ITAR Part 124 is available from the Government Printing Office (GPO) as an annual hardcopy or e-document publication as part of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and as an updated e-document.

Title 22 → Chapter I → Subchapter M → ITAR Part 124

Title 22: Foreign Relations
PART 124—AGREEMENTS, OFF-SHORE PROCUREMENT, AND OTHER DEFENSE SERVICES
Contents
§124.1   Manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.
§124.2   Exemptions for training and military service.
§124.3   Exports of technical data in furtherance of an agreement.
§124.4   Deposit of signed agreements with the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.
§124.5   Proposed agreements that are not concluded.
§124.6   Termination of manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.
§124.7   Information required in all manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.
§124.8   Clauses required both in manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.
§124.9   Additional clauses required only in manufacturing license agreements.
§124.10   Nontransfer and use assurances.
§124.11   Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act.
§124.12   Required information in letters of transmittal.
§124.13   Procurement by United States persons in foreign countries (offshore procurement).
§124.14   Exports to warehouses or distribution points outside the United States.
§124.15   Special Export Controls for Defense Articles and Defense Services Controlled under Category XV: Space Systems and Space Launches.
§124.16   Special retransfer authorizations for unclassified technical data and defense services to member states of NATO and the European Union, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and Switzerland.

Authority: Secs. 2, 38, and 71, Pub. L. 90-629, 90 Stat. 744 (22 U.S.C. 2752, 2778, 2797); 22 U.S.C. 2651a; 22 U.S.C. 2776; Section 1514, Pub. L. 105-261; Pub. L. 111-266; Section 1261, Pub. L. 112-239; E.O. 13637, 78 FR 16129.

Source: 58 FR 39305, July 22, 1993, unless otherwise noted.

§124.1   Manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.

(a) Approval. The approval of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls must be obtained before the defense services described in §120.9(a) of this subchapter may be furnished. In order to obtain such approval, the U.S. person must submit a proposed agreement to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. Such agreements are generally characterized as manufacturing license agreements, technical assistance agreements, distribution agreements, or off-shore procurement agreements, and may not enter into force without the prior written approval of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. Once approved, the defense services described in the agreements may generally be provided without further licensing in accordance with §§124.3 and 125.4(b)(2) of this subchapter. The requirements of this section apply whether or not technical data is to be disclosed or used in the performance of the defense services described in §120.9(a) of this subchapter (e.g., all the information relied upon by the U.S. person in performing the defense service is in the public domain or is otherwise exempt from licensing requirements of this subchapter pursuant to §125.4 of this subchapter). This requirement also applies to the training of any foreign military forces, regular and irregular, in the use of defense articles. Technical assistance agreements must be submitted in such cases. In exceptional cases, the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, upon written request, will consider approving the provision of defense services described in §120.9(a) of this subchapter by granting a license under part 125 of this subchapter.

(b) Classified articles. Copies of approved agreements involving the release of classified defense articles will be forwarded by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls to the Defense Security Service of the Department of Defense.

(c) Amendments. Changes to the scope of approved agreements, including modifications, upgrades, or extensions must be submitted for approval. The amendments may not enter into force until approved by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.

(d) Minor amendments. Amendments which only alter delivery or performance schedules, or other minor administrative amendments which do not affect in any manner the duration of the agreement or the clauses or information which must be included in such agreements because of the requirements of this part, do not have to be submitted for approval. One copy of all such minor amendments must be submitted to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls within thirty days after they are concluded.

[71 FR 20542, Apr. 21, 2006, as amended at 75 FR 52624, Aug. 27, 2010]

§124.2   Exemptions for training and military service.

(a) Technical assistance agreements are not required for the provision of training in the basic operation and maintenance of defense articles lawfully exported or authorized for export to the same recipient. This does not include training in intermediate and depot level maintenance.

(b) Services performed as a member of the regular military forces of a foreign nation by U.S. persons who have been drafted into such forces are not deemed to be defense services for purposes of §120.9 of this subchapter.

(c) NATO countries, Australia, Japan, and Sweden, in addition to the basic maintenance training exemption provided in §124.2(a) and basic maintenance information exemption in §125.4(b)(5) of this subchapter, no technical assistance agreement is required for maintenance training or the performance of maintenance, including the export of supporting technical data, when the following criteria can be met:

(1) Defense services are for unclassified U.S.-origin defense articles lawfully exported or authorized for export and owned or operated by and in the inventory of NATO or the Federal Governments of NATO countries, Australia, Japan or Sweden.

(2) This defense service exemption does not apply to any transaction involving defense services for which congressional notification is required in accordance with §123.15 and §124.11 of this subchapter.

(3) Maintenance training or the performance of maintenance must be limited to inspection, testing, calibration or repair, including overhaul, reconditioning and one-to-one replacement of any defective items, parts or components; and excluding any modification, enhancement, upgrade or other form of alteration or improvement that enhances the performance or capability of the defense article. This does not preclude maintenance training or the performance of maintenance that would result in enhancements or improvements only in the reliability or maintainability of the defense article, such as an increased mean time between failure (MTBF).

(4) Supporting technical data must be unclassified and must not include software documentation on the design or details of the computer software, software source code, design methodology, engineering analysis or manufacturing know-how such as that described in paragraphs (c)4)(i) through (c)(4)(iii) as follows:

(i) Design methodology, such as: The underlying engineering methods and design philosophy utilized (i.e., the “why” or information that explains the rationale for particular design decision, engineering feature, or performance requirement); engineering experience (e.g., lessons learned); and the rationale and associated databases (e.g., design allowables, factors of safety, component life predictions, failure analysis criteria) that establish the operational requirements (e.g., performance, mechanical, electrical, electronic, reliability and maintainability) of a defense article.

(ii) Engineering analysis, such as: Analytical methods and tools used to design or evaluate a defense article’s performance against the operational requirements. Analytical methods and tools include the development and/or use of mockups, computer models and simulations, and test facilities.

(iii) Manufacturing know-how, such as: Information that provides detailed manufacturing processes and techniques needed to translate a detailed design into a qualified, finished defense article.

(5) This defense service exemption does not apply to maintenance training or the performance of maintenance and service or the transfer of supporting technical data for the following defense articles:

(i) All Missile Technology Control Regime Annex Items;

(ii) Firearms listed in Category I; and ammunition listed in Category III for the firearms in Category I;

(iii) [Reserved]

(iv) Naval nuclear propulsion equipment listed in USML Category VI and USML Category XX;

(v) Gas turbine engine hot sections covered by Categories VI(f) and VIII(b);

(vi) Category VIII(f);

(vii) Category XII(c);

(viii) Chemical agents listed in Category XIV (a), biological agents in Category XIV (b), and equipment listed in Category XIV (c) for dissemination of the chemical agents and biological agents listed in Categories XIV (a) and (b);

(ix) [Reserved]

(x) Category XV;

(xi) [Reserved]

(xii) Submersible and semi-submersible vessels and related articles covered in USML Category XX; or

(xiii) Miscellaneous articles covered by Category XXI.

(6) Eligibility criteria for foreign persons. Foreign persons eligible to receive technical data or maintenance training under this exemption are limited to nationals of the NATO countries, Australia, Japan, or Sweden.

[58 FR 39305, July 22, 1993, as amended at 65 FR 45283, July 21, 2000; 66 FR 35899, July 10, 2001; 71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006; 78 FR 40933, July 8, 2013; 79 FR 47, Jan. 2, 2014]

§124.3   Exports of technical data in furtherance of an agreement.

(a) Unclassified technical data. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection or U.S. Postal authorities shall permit the export without a license of unclassified technical data if the export is in furtherance of a manufacturing license or technical assistance agreement which has been approved in writing by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC) and the technical data does not exceed the scope or limitations of the relevant agreement. The approval of the DDTC must be obtained for the export of any unclassified technical data that may exceed the terms of the agreement.

(b) Classified technical data. The export of classified information in furtherance of an approved manufacturing license or technical assistance agreement which provides for the transmittal of classified information does not require further approval from the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls when:

(1) The United States party certifies to the Department of Defense transmittal authority that the classified information does not exceed the technical or product limitations in the agreement; and

(2) The U.S. party complies with the requirements of the Department of Defense National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual concerning the transmission of classified information (unless such requirements are in direct conflict with guidance provided by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, in which case the latter guidance must be followed) and any other requirements of cognizant U.S. departments or agencies.

[58 FR 39305, July 22, 1993, as amended at 68 FR 61102, Oct. 27, 2003; 70 FR 50963, Aug. 29, 2005; 71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006]

§124.4   Deposit of signed agreements with the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.

(a) The United States party to a manufacturing license or a technical assistance agreement must file one copy of the concluded agreement with the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls not later than 30 days after it enters into force. If the agreement is not concluded within one year of the date of approval, the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls must be notified in writing and be kept informed of the status of the agreement until the requirements of this paragraph or the requirements of §124.5 are satisfied.

(b) In the case of concluded agreements involving coproduction or licensed production outside of the United States of defense articles of United States origin, a written statement must accompany filing of the concluded agreement with the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, which shall include:

(1) The identity of the foreign countries, international organization, or foreign firms involved;

(2) A description and the estimated value of the articles authorized to be produced, and an estimate of the quantity of the articles authorized to be produced:

(3) A description of any restrictions on third-party transfers of the foreign-manufactured articles; and

(4) If any such agreement does not provide for United States access to and verification of quantities of articles produced overseas and their disposition in the foreign country, a description of alternative measures and controls to ensure compliance with restrictions in the agreement on production quantities and third-party transfers.

[62 FR 67276, Dec. 24, 1997, as amended at 71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006]

§124.5   Proposed agreements that are not concluded.

The United States party to any proposed manufacturing license agreement or technical assistance agreement must inform the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls if a decision is made not to conclude the agreement. The information must be provided within 60 days of the date of the decision. These requirements apply only if the approval of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls was obtained for the agreement to be concluded (with or without any provisos).

[71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006]

§124.6   Termination of manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.

The U.S. party to a manufacturing license or a technical assistance agreement must inform the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls in writing of the impending termination of the agreement not less than 30 days prior to the expiration date of such agreement.

[71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006]

§124.7   Information required in all manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.

The following information must be included in all proposed manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements. The information should be provided in terms which are as precise as possible. If the applicant believes that a clause or that required information is not relevant or necessary, the applicant may request the omission of the clause or information. The transmittal letter accompanying the agreement must state the reasons for any proposed variation in the clauses or required information.

(1) The agreement must describe the defense article to be manufactured and all defense articles to be exported, including any test and support equipment or advanced materials. They should be described by military nomenclature, contract number, National Stock Number, nameplate data, or other specific information. Supporting technical data or brochures should be submitted in seven copies. Only defense articles listed in the agreement will be eligible for export under the exemption in §123.16(b)(1) of this subchapter.

(2) The agreement must specifically describe the assistance and technical data, including the design and manufacturing know-how involved, to be furnished and any manufacturing rights to be granted;

(3) The agreement must specify its duration; and

(4) The agreement must specifically identify the countries or areas in which manufacturing, production, processing, sale or other form of transfer is to be licensed.

§124.8   Clauses required both in manufacturing license agreements and technical assistance agreements.

The following statements must be included both in manufacturing license agreements and in technical assistance agreements:

(1) “This agreement shall not enter into force, and shall not be amended or extended, without the prior written approval of the Department of State of the U.S. Government.”

(2) “This agreement is subject to all United States laws and regulations relating to exports and to all administrative acts of the U.S. Government pursuant to such laws and regulations.”

(3) “The parties to this agreement agree that the obligations contained in this agreement shall not affect the performance of any obligations created by prior contracts or subcontracts which the parties may have individually or collectively with the U.S. Government.”

(4) “No liability will be incurred by or attributed to the U.S. Government in connection with any possible infringement of privately owned patent or proprietary rights, either domestic or foreign, by reason of the U.S. Government’s approval of this agreement.”

(5) The technical data or defense service exported from the United States in furtherance of this agreement and any defense article which may be produced or manufactured from such technical data or defense service may not be transferred to a foreign person except pursuant to §§124.16 and 126.18, as specifically authorized in this agreement, or where prior written approval of the Department of State has been obtained.

(6) “All provisions in this agreement which refer to the United States Government and the Department of State will remain binding on the parties after the termination of the agreement.”

[58 FR 39305, July 22, 1993, as amended at 76 FR 28177, May 16, 2011]

§124.9   Additional clauses required only in manufacturing license agreements.

(a) Clauses for all manufacturing license agreements. The following clauses must be included only in manufacturing license agreements:

(1) “No export, sale, transfer, or other disposition of the licensed article is authorized to any country outside the territory wherein manufacture or sale is herein licensed without the prior written approval of the U.S. Government unless otherwise exempted by the U.S. Government. Sales or other transfers of the licensed article shall be limited to governments of countries wherein manufacture or sale is hereby licensed and to private entities seeking to procure the licensed article pursuant to a contract with any such government unless the prior written approval of the U.S. Government is obtained.”

(2) “It is agreed that sales by licensee or its sub-licensees under contracts made through the U.S. Government will not include either charges for patent rights in which the U.S. Government holds a royalty-free license, or charges for data which the U.S. Government has a right to use and disclose to others, which are in the public domain, or which the U.S. Government has acquired or is entitled to acquire without restrictions upon their use and disclosure to others.”

(3) “If the U.S. Government is obligated or becomes obligated to pay to the licensor royalties, fees, or other charges for the use of technical data or patents which are involved in the manufacture, use, or sale of any licensed article, any royalties, fees or other charges in connection with purchases of such licensed article from licensee or its sub-licensees with funds derived through the U.S. Government may not exceed the total amount the U.S. Government would have been obligated to pay the licensor directly.”

(4) “If the U.S. Government has made financial or other contributions to the design and development of any licensed article, any charges for technical assistance or know-how relating to the item in connection with purchases of such articles from licensee or sub-licensees with funds derived through the U.S. Government must be proportionately reduced to reflect the U.S. Government contributions, and subject to the provisions of paragraphs (a) (2) and (3) of this section, no other royalties, or fees or other charges may be assessed against U.S. Government funded purchases of such articles. However, charges may be made for reasonable reproduction, handling, mailing, or similar administrative costs incident to the furnishing of such data.”

(5) “The parties to this agreement agree that an annual report of sales or other transfers pursuant to this agreement of the licensed articles, by quantity, type, U.S. dollar value, and purchaser or recipient, shall be provided by (applicant or licensee) to the Department of State.” This clause must specify which party is obligated to provide the annual report. Such reports may be submitted either directly by the licensee or indirectly through the licensor, and may cover calendar or fiscal years. Reports shall be deemed proprietary information by the Department of State and will not be disclosed to unauthorized persons. See §126.10(b) of this subchapter.

(6) (Licensee) agrees to incorporate the following statement as an integral provision of a contract, invoice or other appropriate document whenever the licensed articles are sold or otherwise transferred:

These commodities are authorized for export by the U.S. Government only to (country of ultimate destination or approved sales territory). They may not be resold, diverted, transferred, transshipped, or otherwise be disposed of in any other country, either in their original form or after being incorporated through an intermediate process into other end-items, without the prior written approval of the U.S. Department of State.

(b) Special clause for agreements relating to significant military equipment. With respect to an agreement for the production of significant military equipment, the following additional provisions must be included in the agreement:

(1) “A completed nontransfer and use certificate (DSP-83) must be executed by the foreign end-user and submitted to the Department of State of the United States before any transfer may take place.”

(2) “The prior written approval of the U.S. Government must be obtained before entering into a commitment for the transfer of the licensed article by sale or otherwise to any person or government outside of the approved sales territory.”

§124.10   Nontransfer and use assurances.

(a) Types of agreements requiring assurances. With respect to any manufacturing license agreement or technical assistance agreement which relates to significant military equipment or classified defense articles, including classified technical data, a Nontransfer and Use Certificate (Form DSP-83) (see §123.10 of this subchapter) signed by the applicant and the foreign party must be submitted to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. With respect to all agreements involving classified articles, including classified technical data, an authorized representative of the foreign government must sign the DSP-83 (or provide the same assurances in the form of a diplomatic note), unless the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls has granted an exception to this requirement. The Directorate of Defense Trade Controls may require that a DSP-83 be provided in conjunction with an agreement that does not relate to significant military equipment or classified defense articles. The Directorate of Defense Trade Controls may also require with respect to any agreement that an appropriate authority of the foreign party’s government also sign the DSP-83 (or provide the same assurances in the form of a diplomatic note).

(b) Timing of submission of assurances. Submission of a Form DSP-83 and/or diplomatic note must occur as follows:

(1) Agreements which have been signed by all parties before being submitted to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls may only be submitted along with any required DSP-83 and/or diplomatic note.

(2) If an agreement has not been signed by all parties before being submitted, the required DSP-83 and/or diplomatic note must be submitted along with the signed agreement.

Note to paragraph (b): In no case may a transfer occur before a required DSP-83 and/or diplomatic note has been submitted to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.

[59 FR 29951, June 10, 1994, as amended at 71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006]

§124.11   Congressional certification pursuant to Section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act.

(a) The Arms Export Control Act requires that a certification be provided to the Congress prior to the granting of any approval of a manufacturing license agreement or technical assistance agreement as defined in Sections 120.21 and 120.22 respectively for the manufacturing abroad of any item of significant military equipment (see §120.7 of this subchapter) that is entered into with any country regardless of dollar value. Additionally, any manufacturing license agreement or technical assistance agreement providing for the export of major defense equipment, as defined in §120.8 of this subchapter shall also require a certification when meeting the requirements of §123.15 of this subchapter.

(b) Unless an emergency exists which requires the immediate approval of the agreement in the national security interests of the United States, approval may not be granted until at least 15 calendar days have elapsed after receipt by the Congress of the certification required by 22 U.S.C. 2776(d)(1) involving the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, any member country of that Organization, or Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, or the Republic of Korea or at least 30 calendar days have elapsed for any other country. Approvals may not be granted when the Congress has enacted a joint resolution prohibiting the export.

(c) Persons who intend to export defense articles and defense services pursuant to any exemption in this subchapter under the circumstances described in this section and section 123.15 must provide written notification to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls and include a signed contract and a DSP-83 signed by the applicant, the foreign consignee and the end-user.

[70 FR 34654, June 15, 2005, as amended at 73 FR 38343, Aug. 3, 2009; 77 FR 16599, Mar. 21, 2012]

§124.12   Required information in letters of transmittal.

(a) An application for the approval of a manufacturing license or technical assistance agreement with a foreign person must be accompanied by an explanatory letter. The original letter and seven copies of the letter and eight copies of the proposed agreement shall be submitted to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. The explanatory letter shall contain:

(1) A statement giving the applicant’s Directorate of Defense Trade Controls registration number.

(2) A statement identifying the licensee and the scope of the agreement.

(3) A statement identifying the U.S. Government contract under which the equipment or technical data was generated, improved, or developed and supplied to the U.S. Government, and whether the equipment or technical data was derived from any bid or other proposal to the U.S. Government.

(4) A statement giving the military security classification of the equipment or technical data.

(5) A statement identifying any patent application which discloses any of the subject matter of the equipment or technical data covered by an invention secrecy order issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

(6) A statement of the actual or estimated value of the agreement, including the estimated value of all defense articles to be exported in furtherance of the agreement or amendments thereto. If the value is $500,000 or more, an additional statement must be made regarding the payment of political contributions, fees or commissions, pursuant to part 130 of this subchapter.

(7) A statement indicating whether any foreign military sales credits or loan guarantees are or will be involved in financing the agreement.

(8) The agreement must describe any classified information involved and identify, from Department of Defense form DD254, the address and telephone number of the U.S. Government office that classified the information.

(9) For agreements that may require the export of classified information, the Defense Investigative Service cognizant security offices that have responsibility for the facilities of the U.S. parties to the agreement shall be identified. The facility security clearance codes of the U.S. parties shall also be provided.

(10) A statement specifying whether the applicant is requesting retransfer of defense articles and defense services pursuant to §124.16 of this subchapter.

(b) The following statements must be made in the letter of transmittal:

(1) “If the agreement is approved by the Department of State, such approval will not be construed by (the applicant) as passing on the legality of the agreement from the standpoint of antitrust laws or other applicable statutes, nor will (the applicant) construe the Department’s approval as constituting either approval or disapproval of any of the business terms or conditions between the parties to the agreement.”

(2) “The (applicant) will not permit the proposed agreement to enter into force until it has been approved by the Department of State.”

(3) “The (applicant) will furnish the Department of State with one copy of the signed agreement (or amendment) within 30 days from the date that the agreement is concluded and will inform the Department of its termination not less than 30 days prior to expiration and provide information on the continuation of any foreign rights or the flow of technical data to the foreign party. If a decision is made not to conclude the proposed agreement, the applicant will so inform the Department within 60 days.”

(4) “If this agreement grants any rights to sub-license, it will be amended to require that all sub-licensing arrangements incorporate all the provisions of the basic agreement that refer to the U.S. Government and the Department of State (i.e., 22 CFR 124.9 and 124.10).”

[58 FR 39305, July 22, 1993, as amended at 71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006; 72 FR 71786, Dec. 19, 2007]

§124.13   Procurement by United States persons in foreign countries (offshore procurement).

Notwithstanding the other provisions in part 124 of this subchapter, the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls may authorize by means of a license (DSP-5) the export of unclassified technical data to foreign persons for offshore procurement of defense articles, provided that:

(a) The contract or purchase order for offshore procurement limits delivery of the defense articles to be produced only to the person in the United States or to an agency of the U.S. Government; and

(b) The technical data of U.S.-origin to be used in the foreign manufacture of defense articles does not exceed that required for bid purposes on a build-to-print basis (build-to-print means producing an end-item (i.e., system, subsystem or component) from technical drawings and specifications (which contain no process or know-how information) without the need for additional technical assistance). Release of supporting documentation (e.g., acceptance criteria, object code software for numerically controlled machines) is permissible. Build-to-print does not include the release of any information which discloses design methodology, engineering analysis, detailed process information or manufacturing know-how); and

(c) The contract or purchase order between the person in the United States and the foreign person:

(1) Limits the use of the technical data to the manufacture of the defense articles required by the contract or purchase order only; and

(2) Prohibits the disclosure of the data to any other person except subcontractors within the same country; and

(3) Prohibits the acquisition of any rights in the data by any foreign person; and

(4) Provides that any subcontracts between foreign persons in the approved country for manufacture of equipment for delivery pursuant to the contract or purchase order contain all the limitations of this paragraph (c); and

(5) Requires the foreign person, including subcontractors, to destroy or return to the person in the United States all of the technical data exported pursuant to the contract or purchase order upon fulfillment of their terms; and

(6) Requires delivery of the defense articles manufactured abroad only to the person in the United States or to an agency of the U.S. Government; and

(d) The person in the United States provides the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls with a copy of each contract, purchase order or subcontract for offshore procurement at the time it is accepted. Each such contract, purchase order or subcontract must clearly identify the article to be produced and must identify the license number or exemption under which the technical data was exported; and

(e) Licenses issued pursuant to this section must be renewed prior to their expiration if offshore procurement is to be extended beyond the period of validity of the original approved license. In all instances a license for offshore procurement must state as the purpose “Offshore procurement in accordance with the conditions established in the ITAR, including §124.13. No other use will be made of the technical data.” If the technical data involved in an offshore procurement arrangement is otherwise exempt from the licensing requirements of this subchapter (e.g., §126.4), the DSP-5 referred to in the first sentence of this section is not required. However, the exporter must comply with the other requirements of this section and provide a written certification to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls annually of the offshore procurement activity and cite the exemption under which the technical data was exported. The exemptions under §125.4 of this subchapter may not be used to establish offshore procurement arrangements.

[58 FR 39305, July 22, 1993, as amended at 64 FR 17534, Apr. 12, 1999; 71 FR 20543, Apr. 21, 2006]

§124.14   Exports to warehouses or distribution points outside the United States.

(a) Agreements. Agreements (e.g., contracts) between U.S. persons and foreign persons for the warehousing and distribution of defense articles must be approved by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls before they enter into force. Such agreements will be limited to unclassified defense articles and must contain conditions for special distribution, end-use and reporting. Licenses for exports pursuant to such agreements must be obtained prior to exports of the defense articles unless an exemption under §123.16(b)(1) of this subchapter is applicable.

(b) Required information. Proposed warehousing and distribution agreements (and amendments thereto) shall be submitted to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls for approval. The following information must be included in all such agreements:

(1) A description of the defense articles involved including test and support equipment covered by the U.S. Munitions List. This shall include when applicable the military nomenclature, the Federal stock number, nameplate data, and any control numbers under which the defense articles were developed or procured by the U.S. Government. Only those defense articles specifically listed in the agreement will be eligible for export under the exemption in §123.16(b)(1) of this subchapter.

(2) A detailed statement of the terms and conditions under which the defense articles will be exported and distributed;

(3) The duration of the proposed agreement;

(4) Specific identification of the country or countries that comprise the distribution territory. Distribution must be specifically limited to the governments of such countries or to private entities seeking to procure defense articles pursuant to a contract with a government within the distribution territory or to other eligible entities as specified by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. Consequently, any deviation from this condition must be fully explained and justified. A nontransfer and use certificate (DSP-83) will be required to the same extent required in licensing agreements under §124.9(b).

(c) Required statements. The following statements must be included in all warehousing and distribution agreements:

(1) “This agreement shall not enter into force, and may not be amended or extended, without the prior written approval of the Department of State of U.S. Government.”

(2) “This agreement is subject to all United States laws and regulations related to exports and to all administrative acts of the United States Government pursuant to such laws and regulations.

(3) “The parties to this agreement agree that the obligations contained in this agreement shall not affect the performance of any obligations created by prior contracts or subcontracts which the parties may have individually or collectively with the U.S. Government.”

(4) “No liability will be incurred by or attributed to the U.S. Government in connection with any possible infringement of privately owned patent or proprietary rights, either domestic or foreign by reason of the U.S. Government’s approval of this agreement.”

(5) “No export, sale, transfer, or other disposition of the defense articles covered by this agreement is authorized to any country outside the distribution territory without the prior written approval of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls of the U.S. Department of State.”

(6) “The parties to this agreement agree that an annual report of sales or other transfers pursuant to this agreement of the licensed articles, by quantity, type, U.S. dollar value, and purchaser or recipient shall be provided by (applicant or licensee) to the Department of State.” This clause must specify which party is obligated to provide the annual report. Such reports may be submitted either directly by the licensee or indirectly through the licensor, and may cover calendar or fiscal years. Reports shall be deemed proprietary information by the Department of State and will not be disclosed to unauthorized persons. (See §126.10(b) of this subchapter.)

(7) (Licensee) agrees to incorporate the following statement as an integral provision of a contract, invoice or other appropriate document whenever the articles covered by this agreement are sold or otherwise transferred:

These commodities are authorized for export by the U.S. Government only to (country of ultimate destination or approved sales territory). They may not be resold, diverted, transferred, transshipped, or otherwise be disposed of in any other country, either in their original form or after being incorporated through an intermediate process into other end-items, without the prior written approval of the U.S. Department of State.

(8) “All provisions in this agreement which refer to the United States Government and the Department of State will remain binding on the parties after the termination of the agreement.”

(9) Additional clause. Unless the articles covered by the agreement are in fact intended to be distributed to private persons or entities (e.g., sporting firearms for commercial resale, cryptographic devices and software for financial and business applications), the following clause must be included in all warehousing and distribution agreements: “Sales or other transfers of the licensed article shall be limited to governments of the countries in the distribution territory and to private entities seeking to procure the licensed article pursuant to a contract with a government within the distribution territory, unless the prior written approval of the U.S. Department of State is obtained.”

(d) Special clauses for agreements relating to significant military equipment. With respect to agreements for the warehousing and distribution of significant military equipment, the following additional provisions must be included in the agreement:

(1) A completed nontransfer and use certificate (DSP-83) must be executed by the foreign end-user and submitted to the U.S. Department of State before any transfer may take place.

(2) The prior written approval of the U.S. Department of State must be obtained before entering into a commitment for the transfer of the licensed article by sale or otherwise to any person or government outside the approved distribution territory.

(e) Transmittal letters. Requests for approval of warehousing and distribution agreements with foreign persons must be made by letter. The original letter and seven copies of the letter and seven copies of the proposed agreement shall be submitted to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. The letter shall contain:

(1) A statement giving the applicant’s Directorate of Defense Trade Controls registration number.

(2) A statement identifying the foreign party to the agreement.

(3) A statement identifying the defense articles to be distributed under the agreement.

(4) A statement identifying any U.S. Government contract under which the equipment may have been generated, improved, developed or supplied to the U.S. Government, and whether the equipment was derived from any bid or other proposal to the U.S. Government.

(5) A statement that no classified defense articles or classified technical data are involved.

(6) A statement identifying any patent application which discloses any of the subject matter of the equipment or related technical data covered by an invention secrecy order issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

(f) Required clauses. The following statements must be made in the letter of transmittal:

(1) “If the agreement is approved by the Department of State, such approval will not be construed by (applicant) as passing on the legality of the agreement from the standpoint of antitrust laws or other applicable statutes, nor will (the applicant) construe the Department’s approval as constituting either approval or disapproval of any of the business terms or conditions between the parties to the agreement.”

(2) “The (applicant) will not permit the proposed agreement to enter into force until it has been approved by the Department of State.”

(3) “(Applicant) will furnish the Department of State with one copy of the signed agreement (or amendment thereto) within 30 days from the date that the agreement is concluded, and will inform the Department of its termination not less than 30 days prior to expiration. If a decision is made not to conclude the proposed agreement, (applicant) will so inform the Department within 60 days.”

[58 FR 39305, July 22, 1993, as amended at 71 FR 20544, Apr. 21, 2006]

§124.15   Special Export Controls for Defense Articles and Defense Services Controlled under Category XV: Space Systems and Space Launches.

(a) The export of a satellite or related item controlled by Category XV of part 121 of this subchapter or any defense service controlled by this subchapter associated with the launch in, or by nationals of, a country that is not a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) or a major non-NATO ally of the United States always requires special export controls, in addition to other export controls required by this subchapter, as follows:

(1) All licenses and other requests for approval require a technology transfer control plan (TTCP) approved by the Department of Defense and an encryption technology control plan approved by the National Security Agency. Drafts reflecting advance discussions with both agencies must accompany submission of the license application or proposed technical assistance agreement, and the letter of transmittal required in §124.12 must identify the U.S. Government officials familiar with the preparation of the draft TTCPs. The TTCP must require any U.S. person or entity involved in the export to notify the Department of Defense in advance of all meetings and interactions with any foreign person or entity that is a party to the export and require such U.S. person or entity to certify that it has complied with this notification requirement within 30 days after launch.

(2) The U.S. person must make arrangements with the Department of Defense for monitoring. The costs of such monitoring services must be fully reimbursed to the Department of Defense by the U.S. person receiving such services. The letter of transmittal required under §124.12 must also state that such reimbursement arrangements have been made with the Department of Defense and identify the specific Department of Defense official with whom these arrangements have been made. As required by Public Law 105-261, such monitoring will cover, but not be limited to—

(i) Technical discussions and activities, including the design, development, operation, maintenance, modification, and repair of satellites, satellite components, missiles, other equipment, launch facilities, and launch vehicles;

(ii) Satellite processing and launch activities, including launch preparation, satellite transportation, integration of the satellite with the launch vehicle, testing and checkout prior to launch, satellite launch, and return of equipment to the United States;

(iii) Activities relating to launch failure, delay, or cancellation, including post-launch failure investigations or analyses with regard to either the launcher or the satellite; and

(iv) All other aspects of the launch.

(b) Mandatory licenses for launch failure (crash) investigations or analyses of any satellite controlled pursuant to this subchapter or subject to the EAR: In the event of a failure of a launch from a foreign country (including a post liftoff failure to reach proper orbit)—

(1) The activities of U.S. persons or entities in connection with any subsequent investigation or analysis of the failure continue to be subject to the controls established under section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act, including the requirements under this subchapter for express approval prior to participation in such investigations or analyses, regardless of whether a license was issued under this subchapter for the initial export of the satellite or satellite component;

(2) Officials of the Department of Defense must monitor all activities associated with the investigation or analyses to insure against unauthorized transfer of technical data or services and U.S. persons must follow the procedures set forth in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section.

(c) Although Public Law 105-261 does not require the application of special export controls for the launch of U.S.-origin satellites and components from or by nationals of countries that are members of NATO or major non-NATO allies, such export controls may nonetheless be applied, in addition to any other export controls required under this subchapter, as appropriate in furtherance of the security and foreign policy of the United States. Further, the export of any article or defense service controlled under this subchapter to any destination may also require that the special export controls identified in paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of this section be applied in furtherance of the security and foreign policy of the United States.

(d) Mandatory licenses for exports to insurance providers and underwriters: None of the exemptions or sub-licensing provisions available in this subchapter may be used for the export of technical data in order to obtain or satisfy insurance requirements. Such exports are always subject to the prior approval and re-transfer requirements of sections 3 and 38 of the Arms Export Control Act, as applied by relevant provisions of this subchapter.

[64 FR 13681, Mar. 22, 1999, as amended at 79 FR 27189, May 13, 2014]

§124.16   Special retransfer authorizations for unclassified technical data and defense services to member states of NATO and the European Union, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and Switzerland.

The provisions of §124.8(5) of this subchapter notwithstanding, the Department may approve access to unclassified defense articles exported in furtherance of or produced as a result of a TAA/MLA, and retransfer of technical data and defense services to individuals who are dual national or third-country national employees of the foreign signatory or its approved sub-licensees, including the transfer to dual nationals or third-country nationals who are bona fide regular employees, directly employed by the foreign signatory or approved sub-licensees, provided they are nationals exclusively of countries that are members of NATO the European Union, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and Switzerland and their employer is a signatory to the agreement or has executed a Non Disclosure Agreement. The retransfer must take place completely within the physical territories of these countries or the United States. Permanent retransfer of hardware is not authorized.

[76 FR 28177, May 16, 2011]

CVG Strategy - experts in Quality | ITAR | MIL-STD-810